Wednesday, September 24, 2014

Words to Live By


THE AUBURN CREED
I believe that this is a practical world and that I can count only on what I earn. Therefore, I believe in work, hard work. I believe in education, which gives me the knowledge to work wisely and trains my mind and my hands to work skillfully. I believe in honesty and truthfulness, without which I cannot win the respect and confidence of my fellow men. I believe in a sound mind, in a sound body and a spirit that is not afraid, and in clean sports that develop these qualities. I believe in obedience to law because it protects the rights of all. I believe in the human touch, which cultivates sympathy with my fellow men and mutual helpfulness and brings happiness for all. I believe in my Country, because it is a land of freedom and because it is my own home, and that I can best serve that country by "doing justly, loving mercy, and walking humbly with my God." And because Auburn men and women believe in these things, I believe in Auburn and love it.
-George Petrie (1945)

I didn't go to Auburn but their creed gives me a great standard to try to live up to.  I am proud to be in an educational business and in it purpose to teach skill as well as encourage integrity.

Moving forward,
Jeff Roach

Brooke Transportation Training Solutions
Phone 214-206-1169

jroach@transportationtraining.com
www.brooketraining.com
www.justintimefreight.com

Thursday, September 11, 2014

Advance as a Freight Broker

Here's a testimonial we just got from a student in our advanced freight brokering course.   We are so honored to have our instructor Vinny.  He not only teaches freight brokering excellence he also encourages all his students to higher goals.  My vision for my freight brokering school was just that.  Not only teach students how to be great freight brokers, but also teach them how to have integrity in every business dealing. 

At the end of the day if you do all your work with honesty and diligence you have success even when you don't close the deal.

" Vinny is an outstanding instructor.  I believe he can help anybody gain clarity and move toward even more success in life with his training.  I was able to move forward on several issues I’ve been stuck on for years.  From the very first session I saw results and felt very comfortable with his warm, open, and caring approach.  With his training I was able to determine what was truly important in life and translate that into specific actions.  He was able to hold me to the goals we established and keep me moving forward.  I know he can do the same for you as well.  He has that uncanny ability to get to the heart of the matter in an amazing way.  Through his training I was able to facilitate change very quickly and positively.  I know that working with Vinny will provide you with an amazing growth experience and lead to a positive change in your life.  If you are ready for growth and a positive change, than I highly recommend my trainer, but most of all, my friend, Vinny."



Thank you.
A. Gonzalez


Moving forward,

Jeff Roach

www.transportationtraining.com

Tuesday, September 9, 2014

Truckers Needed


We have a truck driver shortage.   Drivers are needed to keep our economy going .  As truck drivers stop driving to pursue other ventures or retire, they are not being replaced by a younger crop.  We need to encourage those needing employment to look into the transportation industry.  Freight haulers enjoy the freedom of the wide open road and see the country while earning a living.  As a freight broker I depend on and appreciate reliable truck drivers.  I rally behind anything that supports this critical arm of our industry.   Below are excerpts from Business Insiders explanation of why we have a shortage of drivers:

Higher driving costs and falling pay have created a truck-driver shortage that's likely to worsen in the coming years. The American Trucking Associations (ATA) estimates the U.S. is short 30,000 truck drivers — a number expected to surge to 239,000 by 2022.

"Smaller 'owner/operator' firms are increasingly dropping by the wayside as the cost of operations and maintenance are simply becoming too expensive to stay in business," Paul Pittman, a planner at a North Carolina-based logistics company, told Business Insider by email.  So drivers are suddenly faced with the choice of leaving the profession entirely or moving to a larger company where wages are likely to be lower. 

"As controls continue to tighten, many of the existing drivers currently employed are turning to other areas of employment simply to get off the road and escape some of the regulations implemented to govern their operations," Pittman said.

To hang on, small operators are forced to cut corners …

The article goes on to explain other reasons for the decline in drivers include trucker’s increased time away from home, under appreciation of the driver and dishonesty in recruiting. 

There may finally be some movement on this front. Last month, Swift, one of the largest haulers in the U.S., announced it would refocus expenditures on better labor conditions for employees, including higher wages.  To read the entire article click here.


Moving forward,

Jeff Roach
www.freightbrokertraining.com

Monday, September 8, 2014

Start Selling

Selling does not start until you get the first no.

Moving forward,

Jeff Roach
www.transportationtraining.com