Tuesday, December 13, 2016

When Loads Get Lost

Everyone in the transportation industry knows that on any given day hundreds if not thousands of freight loads get sidetracked.  The reasons a load is waylaid are endless, since there are so many aspects and people involved in the moving of a load. The carrier might not show up for a pick up, or a carrier could get sidetracked in Vegas while he has my load.    Loads can be stolen while a carrier takes a quick break at a coffee shop.  Carriers however are not always the problem.   Snowstorms, bad weather, trucks breaking down, DOT and even the shippers changing plans or load details at the last minute can turn a load into a nightmare.  

The key to controlling a situation like this, is communication.  Shippers are not new to these types of situations and can be very forgiving to a Freight Broker providing they are kept in the loop.  It is essential for the broker to contact the shipper as soon as he finds out about an issue with the shipper’s load. The worst thing that can happen is that the shipper finds out about a problem from someone other than their broker.  

Make sure the shipper has a clear understanding of the situation and tell them what you are doing about it. Keep in touch with them periodically even if you have no new news just to let them know that you are still on it.  

Regarding the carrier, make sure you have the dispatcher’s phone number, the driver’s phone number and an "after hours" number or someway to effectively find the carrier.  It is imperative that you can reach the driver and dispatcher during a crisis.  Make sure to talk with both the dispatcher and driver to get all the details of the situation.  Sometimes you don't get the whole story by just talking to one.  Stay on top of the carrier to make sure that they are doing all they can to handle the situation. 

When your shipper trusts you, they will understand so long as you keep them informed.  The trust between you will be strengthened if you handle a bad situation well and with transparency.  

Communication is not just important, it is key.

Moving forward,

Jeff Roach
www.brooketraining.com

 

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